Armed ViolenceNews

Terrorists Abduct 2 Nurses In Kaduna 24 Hours After Abduction Of Students

Less than 24 hours after 22 students of a private university in Kaduna State, Northwest Nigeria were abducted, terrorists have abducted two nurses.

Two nurses working with Idon General Hospital in Kajuru Local Government Area of Kaduna State, Northwest Nigeria have been kidnapped by terrorists, in the early hours of Thursday, April 22.

The nurses who were on the night shift before they were taken hostage, have been identified as Afiniky Bako and Grace Inkut.

The terrorists attacked the hospital located less than a kilometre from a police checkpoint along the Kaduna-Kachia road in Idon, barely 24 hours after students of Greenfield University, a private tertiary institution in the state were abducted from the school.

HumAngle reported that 22 students and staff members were unaccounted for since terrorists attacked the campus Tuesday night. One school guard was killed in the incident.

According to Channels Television report, Cafra Caino, Chairman of Kajuru Local Government Area, while confirming the incident revealed that the terrorists gained access into the general hospital with deadly weapons through the fence and started shooting sporadically within the hospital premises.

The Chairman, however, assured that plans were in progress to boost security in the hospital and environs to avoid a recurrence of such an attack.

Abductions have been on the increase in Northwest Nigeria since late 2020. Between Feb. 15 and March 12, 1,097 people were kidnapped across Nigeria, with the fourth-highest number of incidents recorded in Kaduna, according to data from the Nigeria Security Tracker (NST).

In 2020, an average of 240 people were victims of kidnapping during the same one month period.

Despite increasing abduction for ransom cases in the state, Nasir El-Rufai, Governor of Kaduna State has reiterated that his government would not negotiate with or pay ransom to kidnappers.


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