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In Zamfara, Communities Bear Scars Of Persistent Terror Attacks

Terror groups continued to target communities in Nigeria's northwestern region. The violence has displaced thousands and impacted the livelihoods of the local population.

The remote agrarian communities of Fakuji and Saibaure in Nigeria’s restive northwestern Zamfara state bear the scars of vicious terror raids by groups operating in the region. 

HumAngle learnt that persistent terror attacks In Fakuji community of Kaura Namoda Local Government Area (LGA) have forced many residents to flee to Sabon Gari and Kaura Namoda town. 

Many homes are deserted by residents seeking shelter elsewhere. Some residents harvest their farm produce during the day and flee to safety in the evening.  Scars left in the community include stores containing provisions and pharmaceutical products looted by terrorists known locally as bandits. 

Muhammadu Kabiru, a resident of the Fakuji community, lamented about the constant threat from terrorists including stealing animals, food, and little money with them. 

Kabiru said the threats have forced many to flee while those that remain leave their home at night and come back in the morning to work on the farm. 

He also complained about the lack of support from security forces. 

In Saibaure community which is located around 50 km from Gusau, the state capital,  about 30 traditional food grains preservation and storage containers used by farmers were also set ablaze by terrorists affiliated with Dan Sadiyya and Hassan.

These indigenous storage structures are cheap, eco-friendly and preserve grain crops that provide locals with calories and proteins. They also provide a steady source of income for rural dwellers and store seeds for the next planting season.

HumAngle understands that Fakuji, Saibure, Gidan Gaya, Ungur Rugu, in Kaura Namoda LGA have come under terrorist attacks. 

Persistent terror attacks in the Northwest region particularly in Kaduna, Zamfara, Sokoto, and Katsina states have led to a deterioration in security and humanitarian conditions in several communities. 

What began as a low-intensity security crisis associated with cattle rustling and conflict between pastoralists and farming communities snowballed into violence and wide-scale kidnapping for ransom of locals, students and commuters. 

According to recent data from IOM, DTM project, Katsina overtook Zamfara state as the state hosting the second-largest share of IDPs in North-central and Northwest Nigeria while Zamfara hosted the third largest IDP population in North-central and Northwest Nigeria with 142,680 individuals. 

Efforts made to get reactions from SP Muhammed Shehu, spokesperson for the Nigerian Police in Zamfara state was unsuccessful as he did not respond to the calls and texts put across to him. 


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Murtala Abdullahi

Abdullahi Murtala is a researcher and reporter. His expertise is in conflict reporting, climate and environmental justice, and charting the security trends in Nigeria and the Lake Chad region. He founded the Goro Initiative and contributes to dialogues, publications and think-tanks that report on climate change and human security. He tweets via @murtalaibin

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