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EU Humanitarian Aid Flight Delivers Relief Materials In DR Congo

European Union humanitarian aid flight helicopter, operated by the World Food Programme, has landed in Katwe, bringing in aid workers and life-saving supplies to hard-to-reach communities.

The European Union’s humanitarian air service – the EU Humanitarian Aid Flight, operated by the World Food Programme (WFP), has delivered life-saving aid to hard-to-reach areas and for humanitarian organisations working with the communities of Katwe and surrounding villages in North Kivu of Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).

DRC is the world’s most neglected displacement crisis due to overwhelming needs and an acute lack of funding, as well as media and diplomatic inattention, according to the Norwegian Refugee Council’s (NRC) annual list.

For several years, the province of North Kivu in the Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has been destroyed by multiple conflicts.

According to the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC), an estimate of over 1 million people have fled the violence, making the region one of the most unstable ones in the DRC.

Providing humanitarian aid is a major challenge as roads are in a poor condition. The population lacks basic services such as schooling for the children. The local economy is in dreadful straits due to the deplorable state of roads, as well as high insecurity and conflict in North Kivu. 

With the EU’s humanitarian air service, the helicopter can land anywhere, transporting humanitarian workers, medical teams and/or cargo to crisis-affected areas in the region.

In North Kivu, humanitarian organisation HEKS-EPER teamed up with EU partner Danish Church Aid (DCA). With EU humanitarian funding, DCA has been building water, sanitation and hygiene facilities, and is providing awareness-raising sessions on hygiene.

The humanitarian air service provides a lifeline for millions of people caught in humanitarian crises. In such situations, ensuring fast and safe access to the affected areas, humanitarian air services are used to transport humanitarian staff and aid and to carry out medical and security evacuation, if needed.


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