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ATJLF Announces Funding Opportunity For Transitional Justice Projects In W. Africa

“Applications should contain pioneering ideas that seek to promote community-centred and transformational projects that amplify the role of survivors and victims in transitional justice processes in West Africa.”

The Africa Transitional Justice Legacy Fund (ATJLF) is now accepting applications for its third-round call for proposals for funding.

It announced this yesterday, Sept. 27, in a statement encouraging civil society organisations and other eligible groups whose works are related to transitional justice and human rights to apply for support.

To be eligible, applicants should be operating in Cote d’Ivoire, Gambia, Guinea, Liberia, Mali, Northeast Nigeria, and Sierra Leone.

“The ATJLF will be providing funding support to enable organisations implement pioneering and impactful interventions in transitional justice processes in Africa. The Fund’s goal is to help rebuild communities and (re)activate survivor agency in West Africa,” it stated. 

The Fund is expecting proposals that focus on transitional justice issues such as Truth, Justice and Accountability; Reparations; and Institutional Reform and Enabling Environments.

“Applications should contain pioneering ideas that seek to promote community-centred and transformational projects that amplify the role of survivors and victims in transitional justice processes in West Africa. Proposed initiatives should be geared towards rebuilding communities, empowering citizens, and transforming societies either in conflict, or those emerging from conflicts and dictatorships.”

The ATJLF added that it would be receiving applications till Oct. 31, 2021, and would notify successful applicants between November and December.

Application guidelines and details can be found here.

The ATJLF, which has supported 42 organisations across West Africa with over $1.5 million since its establishment, recently transformed from a project to an independent public charity organisation — allowing it to explore more funding opportunities for transitional justice issues.

“The work is huge. There is a lot of work to be done to repair societies from the wounds of the past, to deal with the trauma that the society is experiencing, to deal with past human rights violations and crimes against humanity,”  Makmid Kamara, ATJLF Director, told HumAngle in January.

“But the work needs to be done and the civil society needs to be at the forefront of that. And survivors need to keep speaking out, because we can only get the change we want to see if those who are affected are ready, willing, and capable to speak out because the government alone cannot do the work.”


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Kunle Adebajo

'Kunle is Investigations Editor and Head of Internal Factcheck at HumAngle. He tweets and monitors trends @KunleAdebajo.

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